Shell Candles

12 01 2016

shell candle3

I’d love to call this a DIY, but I was so amateur that this may be more helpful as a “what not to do.” Anyway, last Christmas I made soap; this Christmas my DIY was shell candles!

shell candle2

These beauts were collected on my last trip to Cumberland Island, and I’d wanted to do something with them ever since. Making soap was so easy, I decided making candles would be too. It starts out easy enough:

shell candle1

Supplies, above, left to right: candle thermometer (which I ended up not using), soy wax shavings, blue dye, candle scent, and wicks.

Online “how to” guides weren’t as comprehensive as soap guides… but it seemed the “real” way to make candles was by melting wax in a double boiler over a stove and using the thermometer to ensure it reaches the exact right temp. That’s too exacting for me! Turns out that soy wax does pretty well in a microwave, and you can even bypass the thermometer.

shell candle5

I used my giant Pyrex measuring cup (make sure it’s not also used for food), and dumped in a bunch of soy shavings. I attempted to crack one of the blue dye chips in half, not wanting too much blue.

shell candle6

I melted in intervals; search online for ideas of how long to go at first. Maybe a few minutes, then stir and break it down into much shorter periods until mixed. It starts to turn a gross flaky yellow as it melts. And just when I was worried the dye wouldn’t melt…

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Well, the dye certainly did its job! So much for a “light blue” tint. So lesson #1, use a hell of a lot less of the dye than you think.

I added in some scent, stirred, and let it sit. It’s not good (especially for certain container types) to pour freshly melted wax – too hot. Better to let it sit for several minutes. Here’s where you could still use your candle thermometer. I had a hardware heat gun that mostly gave me an idea just by pointing it at the wax. Think it took about 12 minutes.

While waiting for the wax to cool, assemble your candles. I arranged my shells over a bed of gravel to prop up their ends, because if left to their natural standing state, the liquid wax would drain out of the ends of them.

shell candle4

Some guides say to glue the wicks in with hot glue; others say the wax will melt that, so use wax itself. I dunno. I went with Epoxy and it worked fine. My wicks had those metal ends to them that you can make lie flat, which was helpful.

Then, pour!

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Well, it works….

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But it was definitely TOO blue. I mean, it kind of looks like that dark blue toilet cleaner stuff:

shell candle8

So I had the brilliant idea of adding a thin non-dyed layer of wax on top to dilute the blue. Perfect, right?

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Just a bit, no dye this time. It poured in well…

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But as it started drying, it dried so opaque that it became basically white with little bits of dark blue peeking out.

shell candle13

Still, not the worst effect, just not what I was going for. Once they dried (over a few hours), I used a metal scraper to clean some of the edges where the dark blue rose above the white. Next, I trimmed the wicks so just a small amount rose above the wax.

shell candle14

Not perfect, but not too bad!

shell candle15

I noticed the wax sinks a bit right around the wick on some of them. On a couple  I noticed it before drying and tried to add more melty wax to fill it in, but it still collapses. Still don’t know why it does that.

Anyway, the final test remained: would they burn properly, or combust?

shell candle16

I am pleased to report, they DO burn properly! So it’s a success, though a messily done one.

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Yay! So, lessons learned:
1) Try to find shells that won’t spill wax everywhere when lit.
2) Use much, much less dye than you think you’ll need.
3) Soy wax DOES melt well in a microwave, but that candle thermometer may still come in handy.
4) Even the thinnest layers of wax dry really opaque.

Cheers. 🙂

 

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Vulture Plushie

3 12 2015

This is a year late in posting! But for ages I’ve wanted to make vulture stuffed animals. Unfortunately, I know next to nothing about sewing, and less about designing a pattern for something like this. So – my future line of vulture plushies are still in “trial and error” phase.

So this is not a DIY or tutorial. More like a “how not to.” (Also, sorry for the crappy iPhone pic quality.)

vulture pillow1

Above, my first attempt at a pattern and trying to decide which buttons to use for the eyes. And okay, I realize that vultures don’t really have yellow feet and beaks, but I just thought it would translate better.

Cutting out my first attempt:

vulture pillow2

The hard part (for me) is that the head/beak/feet are made from different color cloth and have to be added in there somehow on the front side, but then the whole thing has to be sewed in reverse (so you can’t really see how much you’re encroaching on the pattern).

vulture pillow3

Cuties! Front and back of attempt #1, above. Sadly, attempt #1, while the cutest, had some trouble. So I tried 2 more attempts (e.g. instead of shaped colors on top of the black print, using each color without backing):

vulture pillow4

The feet kept getting continuously bigger as I would sew them and then not have enough room to pull all of the feet rightside out.

vulture pillow5

Lol. My 3 attempts pre-stuffing. The left one is the first, and IMO still the cutest. However, you can see its stupid, unturned feet and too much black around the beak. The second one did not turn out right at ALL. The third, on the right, just doesn’t say “vulture” to me, but that’s the one I finished cause I could turn its full beak and feet out:

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Okay, it’s a little cute, right?

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Even though its beak looks wonky.

Finished product, perched on my dresser!:

vulture pillow8





DIY Pet Pillow

2 04 2015

So, I did a lot of DIY for Christmas last year (yes, this post is VERY late in coming), and that included my first attempt making a pet pillow (more specifically a cat pillow) for my friend L, who loves her cat, Misha. 🙂 This is pretty easy to make, and people love custom things, so if you have a pet lover in your life, this might be the gift for them!

Wanna make your own?

You will need:
– pet photo, full-body (unless you want a floating head or something)
– t-shirt transfer photo paper, sold at any office store like Staples
– computer and printer (obviously)
– white cotton material (I get a full yard to have extra leftover)
– an iron
– pillow stuffing
– sewing supplies (needle, white thread)

First, get a picture, full body view, of the pet of your choice….a little harder doing a gift, because your friend may wonder why you’re asking for a pic of their pet…Anyway, load the pic to your computer. If you have photo editing software, you can edit the area around the cat to be white (select and erase, or dodge, etc.) so it’ll be easier to cut/transfer to material without getting unwanted background elements. You can always do a close cut with scissors too.

pillow supplies

pillow supplies

See my lovely supplies, above, including the printed pet image. (Oh yes, and try not to be an idiot like me and forget to flip your image before printing if any words are visible (like her ID tag); otherwise they’ll iron on backwards.) Now it’s time to cut out your image. If you weren’t able to make the image background white, cut as close as possible to the pet itself. Because I was able to edit mine white, I could leave a bit of a margin which is easier to deal with.

misha pillow2

Cute! Cut out your white cloth to make 2 pieces that are bigger (at least a couple inches around the image) than the pic. It really doesn’t take much cloth since your transfer paper size is only 8.5×11″, regular paper size, which is pretty small. Now, for the ironing! Iron your cloth first. The transfer paper will come with directions; just follow those.

misha pillow3

Let your new picture-cloth cool down, then you can cut out closer to the pet shape, but remember to leave plenty of room around the edges. Leave the cloth with the pet image facing up flat on a table. Lay the other, blank white cloth on top of it, aligning the edges of the cloth. (If you want the back of the pillow to be the backside of the pet, you’ll need to get a picture of the back of him/her, iron that onto cloth, and then place your cloths so that the images are touching/facing each other.) Then sew around it…again, be sure to sew leaving a couple inches of white visible instead of right next to the pet, or when it’s stuffed, some of the pet image will be cut off. I used a sewing machine, but you could easily do it by hand. Don’t sew all the way around; leave several inches open. You’ll need to reach in the opening to add stuffing. Turn the sewn pillow inside out – now the pet is on the outside!

misha pillow4

Now it’s time to add stuffing. Any craft store like Hobby Lobby should have this. When it’s fully stuffed, take the needle and thread and, by hand, sew the opening closed.

misha pillow5

Ta da! I will admit, this is not a great picture of the pillow. The pet photo quality was really sharp, and it’s eyes didn’t actually look so wonky. BUT – either way, my friend thought it was cute, and it was definitely something unexpected. 🙂





Project: Mouse

20 01 2015

I haven’t abandoned this blog! It’s just life getting in the way as usual. In a 2 week time span, I’ve traveled to a tropical vacation spot and will travel to a frozen cold business city. Then there was the biopsy business which was totally not cool except for the fact that I’m now technically part titanium. And I’m enough of a nerd to be excited about that.

Anyway, I’ve been making time for little craft projects. Last summer, I fell in love with this line of vegetable/animal figurines called Homegrown. OMG. They are the cutest! I can’t decide which of them to buy yet, so in the meantime I decided to try making the rutabaga mouse out of old polymer clay.

mouse1

You’re probably supposed to use foil or an armature for the body, but I thought I’d try to get away with making it smaller without that stuff.

mouse2

Rough. Man, is it hard to get things smooth! By the time I baked it, it looked pretty okay. Then I knocked its ear off. And then its arm fell off. 😦

mouse3

However! I epoxy-ed it all back together, and the acrylics worked brilliantly. You can see the picture of the Enesco/Homegrown version behind it. It’s much better than mine, but I’m still pretty proud of it. Oh, and those are a couple of random, in-process, clay swans on the painting foil.

Cute!

Cute!

The cooking time confuses me, because the clay package said 15 minutes for every 1/4 inch, but the mouse’s body was so much thicker than the rest. I ended up burning the bottom of him, but! paint fixes all.





DIY Soap

5 11 2014

soap10

I wanted to go DIY this year for holiday gifts, because it seems like everyone’s at that point where they “don’t know” when you ask what they want or, if they do want something, they buy it for themselves. Guess we’re truly boring old adults now! Anyway, soap sounds like a good idea because it’s both useful AND pretty. Win. Apparently, serious soap making is straight up dangerous. Like, it can burn your skin off. But anyone can do melt and pour! I’m experimenting with it now to perfect everything before X-mas. The soaps above are melt and pour goat’s milk with coffee (the brown ones) and half rosemary/half coffee for the other.

Here’s what you do:

glycerin soap base

glycerin soap base

Stop by your Michaels or Hobby Lobby with a weekly 40% off coupon and get a soap base for around $6.50, $7, something like that. The one above is clear glycerin. Some others are white/opaque like goat’s milk and shea butter.

soap mold

soap mold

You’ll need some molds. I got this one for around $3. It’s pretty basic so it could be versatile, but they make them with all kinds of patterns.

additives - dye and scents

additives – dye and scents

Then buy whatever additives you might want. Craft stores will sell various colorants, soap scents, and essential oils. The oils are pretty expensive, so I went with the soap scents (most are around $5 at Michaels and $3 at Hobby Lobby). I’m not sure if there’s a benefit to using these over perfumes and other colorings – I figured it’s best to be safe since this is going on skin.

Pyrex mixing cup

Pyrex mixing cup

You’ll need a mixing cup or bowl to melt the soap base in that’s microwave safe. People recommended Pyrex, so I bought an enormous 4 cup Pyrex mixer. You will also need something to stir it with. I use popsicle sticks for my resin, and they work fine here too.

more additives - tea!

more additives – tea!

I like the idea of putting random things in the soap. Some people recommended tea, herbs, coffee, oatmeal. Those can function as exfoliants and possibly smell good. I’m trying to experiment by adding scents to some and leaving others without. So far the tea smell seems to come through if you put a lot in. I also used very strong smelling tea (some kind of jasmine fruit thing).

making the soap - part 1!

making the soap – part 1!

So – to make the soap: first, cut up some of your soap base. It cuts really easy, like a butter knife can do it. I do a few squares at a time; it’s pretty easy to add more. Drop them in the mixing cup and microwave them, 20 – 30 seconds depending on how much, stir, and continue on 10 second intervals until it’s all melted.

freshly poured

freshly poured

Depending on what you want, you can add your coloring/scents/other random things into the mixing up or into the individual molds and mix. I find it easier/more mixable in the mixing cup, but I don’t want all of the same kind, so above I did them one by one. I found that you can mix up a clear soap base with an opaque one, if you add only very little opaque and mix only a little, really just swirl it. The opaque will mostly take over, but it still makes some cool cloudy effects. The two at the top are oatmeal/goat’s milk and tea/goat’s milk.

more soap cooling down

more soap cooling down

Here I tried tea – a LOT of tea – in the top right in a clear base. Clear is a nice idea, because then you can really see what’s inside, but tea tends to make everything a mucky brown color. At the bottom I added fresh herbs. Feeling like they might turn black (fresh = moisture in the leaves = mold over time), but I’ll wait and see. Anyway, let everything cool. I leave it out for 3 or 4 hours then pop in the freezer for 15 minutes or so (makes it easier to pop them out). I left some in the freezer overnight and they had all this gross condensation on them – so maybe don’t do that.

Ta da!

Ta da!

The finished herb and tea soaps. More experimenting to do. But I like that it’s pretty easy and cheap. Wrapped up with a ribbon/string around them, these could make cute gifts!





Christmas Zentangle

9 12 2013
Candy cane zentangle card for the patients :)

Candy cane zentangle card for the patients 🙂

I’ve posted about zentangle a few times. As a volunteer with my hospital’s Humanities in Medicine program, zentangle is one of the projects we do with patients and family members. Cards are very popular, especially ones incorporating color. A co-volunteer brought in holiday stencils and we decided to use zentangle as a minor decorative element with the stencils to make holiday cards. 🙂 This candy cane one will be given to a patient or visitor or passed out at our big cafeteria table event in a couple weeks.

Then last week my other office (the non-hospital one, though I only have 1 job with 1 company and just travel between…not to make it confusing or anything) had a holiday party for which I had to buy/make decorations. I found “lollipops” in the company’s colors from Hobby Lobby (just 50 cents each!) and made this for the dessert table. I was so proud! And then co-worker R said the lollipops look like balloons. 😦

Real candy canes! Office party decoration for the dessert table

Real candy canes! Office party decoration for the dessert table





Can I Patent This?

18 07 2013

image
Seriously, I am excited about this. Every time I make a resin pendant, it’s this huge hassle. You have to sand edges, reapply resin, and repeat. Then usually you’ll have it almost perfect except for a little drip on one side or a little piece of dust that embeds in the surface; then you have to do it all over again. I’ve been hanging the pieces on the handle of a colander for a while so I could resin multiple sides at once, but that didn’t stop the dust. So I ask my dad if he has ideas… And he creates the Resin Box (so it’s him that should get the patent, I suppose.)

And it’s so simple: one cardboard box, lined with plastic, with the flat part of hanger latched onto the box at a diagonal, and the inside flaps of the box sprayed with… Some kind of thing that prevents cardboard dust from coming off of it. I just hang my pieces on cut wire around the hanger, close it up, then rest something on the lid to keep closed. No more dust!

Some nice new pieces coming up:

Brand new and almost finished!

Brand new and almost finished!

Heavens, I typed this from my phone & it took forever!





After the rain…

21 06 2013

spring flowers4
It had finished raining by the time I got home from work today, and the flowers loved it. I guess with the Florida heat, they’re always a little water-starved.
spring flowers4
spring flowers2
spring flowers1

wild geranium

wild geranium


The wild geranium, above, is a current favorite of mine. I recently tried using them with my resin jewelry to great results. The color preserves well, and they dry very easily in silica gel.
Speaking of resin…
Speaking of geraniums...here are a couple in-process, plus the inards of that daisy-like purple flower above in the post.

Speaking of geraniums…here are a couple in-process, plus the inards of that daisy-like purple flower above in the post.


some pieces further along...

some pieces further along…


Great tools for resin jewelry - my tiny wire cutter and (on the left) the thing that opens and closes jump rings...oh, and in the back is a clamp which is perfect for propping up pieces when letting an eye wire insert dry (the thing that lets you string a pendant).

Great tools for resin jewelry – my tiny wire cutter and (on the left) the thing that opens and closes jump rings…oh, and in the back is a clamp which is perfect for propping up pieces when letting an eye wire insert dry (the thing that lets you string a pendant).


great little thing for holding light items - a good mini dust cover. Seriously, that's the trickiest thing about resin, not letting dust fall in the piece while drying.

great little thing for holding light items – a good mini dust cover. Seriously, that’s the trickiest thing about resin, not letting dust fall in the piece while drying.


Oh, and here’s a resin tip: never leave your stirring stick inside the mixing cup when you’re done; always place it on top (when dry, you can just pry it off). If you leave it inside the cup…
..then this is what happens. 1 ruined stirring stick. :(

..then this is what happens. 1 ruined stirring stick. 😦


Hopefully will be having some new Etsy jewelry pieces soon, and then… my first stuffed animal!





DIY Tie-Dye: Photo Tutorial

4 05 2013

tie dye1
Yeah! I decided a few weeks ago to try tie-dye and have become slightly obsessed! A couple nights ago I did a massive tie dye session (partly to try out a new range of dye colors, and partly for something that I have future Etsy plans for), and managed to document with photos. Though others have done tie-dye tutorials before and better than me, I decided to share my experience:

everything you need

everything you need


See your “ingredients” above. Every source I read recommended to use soda ash, which is this white powder you pour into water that helps the cloth absorb dye. I bought this Tulip brand soda ash for $6 at Hobby Lobby. It comes with 2 packs. I also bought Tulip dye. The small primary color package costs $10; the Carousel package is $20 and has extra dye packets (but Hobby Lobby has a weekly 40% off coupon).
It’s also SUPER important to remember: use NATURAL fabrics. This tutorial is for fiber reactive dye like Tulip which is, from what I’ve seen, the easiest stuff to find, use, and buy. So – make sure your fabrics are cotton, silk, viscose, rayon….if it’s synthetic like polyester, it won’t bind with the dye (acid dyes are another story). See the end of the post to see what happens when you try to dye synthetics the “wrong way.” Oh, also if you’re using cotton – remember that it shrinks, so you might want to wash it first.
You need gloves, because this stuff will dye your skin. Seriously. I turned the garage into my work station by laying down plastic garbage bags.
First step: fill a bucket with water and pour in the soda ash:
Adding soda ash to water

Adding soda ash to water


What you want to do is stir in and soak all your fabrics for about 20 minutes:
Add and stir all cloth into the soda ash water.

Add and stir all cloth into the soda ash water.


Then wring out each piece and lay flat on the garbage bags. You DO want them to be wet when you dye them.

Then wring out each piece and lay flat on the garbage bags. You DO want them to be wet when you dye them.


lay out flat...

lay out flat…


Then you have to bind up with rubber bands all your fabrics. You can do a spiral, bulls eye, stripes, crumply style, etc….endless options. I won’t get into too much detail about how to do those, because if you get a Tulip dye kit, it has a “how to” guide.
Quick spiral example: from your laid-flat shirt, pick a point that you want to be the center of the spiral.

Quick spiral example: from your laid-flat shirt, pick a point that you want to be the center of the spiral.


Hold the point and twist. Keep twisting until the shirt is fully wrapped; it will look kind of like a hurricane.

Hold the point and twist. Keep twisting until the shirt is fully wrapped; it will look kind of like a hurricane.


You can see the "hurricane" shape start to form. Try to tuck in the edges and end with a circular lump. Bind it with rubber bands.

You can see the “hurricane” shape start to form. Try to tuck in the edges and end with a circular lump. Bind it with rubber bands.


Here's a bunch of my shirts bound up.

Here’s a bunch of my shirts bound up.


Now it’s time to dye! Be very careful, because if it gets anywhere, it will stain.
Fill up the dye bottles to the line at the top. They already have dye in them. Then shake until all the powdered dye is dissolved.

Fill up the dye bottles to the line at the top. They already have dye in them. Then shake until all the powdered dye is dissolved.


A spiral example: the bound-up spiral looks kind of like a pie. Think of pie pieces when you dye it. Squeeze a triangle of 1 color and do the same on the triangle opposite.

A spiral example: the bound-up spiral looks kind of like a pie. Think of pie pieces when you dye it. Squeeze a triangle of 1 color and do the same on the triangle opposite.


Add your next color. I love overlapping to make purples, greens, and oranges.

Add your next color. I love overlapping to make purples, greens, and oranges.


Last, add the yellow.

Last, add the yellow.


Flip it over. Now dye this side. You want to put as much dye as possible - there will still be white places inside the folds of the shirt.

Flip it over. Now dye this side. You want to put as much dye as possible – there will still be white places inside the folds of the shirt.


Primary colored spiral on the left, carousel colored one of the right

Primary colored spiral on the left, carousel colored one of the right


When finished, put each item into its own plastic bag. Wrap and leave for 24 hours. Tulip advises for 8, but you get nice bright colors with 24.

When finished, put each item into its own plastic bag. Wrap and leave for 24 hours. Tulip advises for 8, but you get nice bright colors with 24.


The next day, it's time to wash out the dye! Here's a piece fresh out of the bag that's dyed "bulls eye" style. Put on gloves...

The next day, it’s time to wash out the dye! Here’s a piece fresh out of the bag that’s dyed “bulls eye” style. Put on gloves…


Wash out the dye until the water runs clear. Some sources say use cold, some say warm, some say hot and fade to cold. I've tried it all 3 ways, and they all work. I prefer cold first, then warm (gets more magenta out), then finish with cold.

Wash out the dye until the water runs clear. Some sources say use cold, some say warm, some say hot and fade to cold. I’ve tried it all 3 ways, and they all work. I prefer cold first, then warm (gets more magenta out), then finish with cold.


Then take your rubber bands off (cut them if it's easier) and keep washing. This shirt is done; now I can hang it up until the rest are finished.

Then take your rubber bands off (cut them if it’s easier) and keep washing. This shirt is done; now I can hang it up until the rest are finished.


After rinsing out, you’ll then need to put the items in the washing machine. I use warm water and detergent. The colors will fade but only slightly. Here’s the finished bulls eye shirt:
finished bulls eye

finished bulls eye


Back to the washing:
This one is a double spiral with crumpled ends.

This one is a double spiral with crumpled ends.


...with the rubber bands off, still wet

…with the rubber bands off, still wet


Here are some more of the final products:
carousel spiral...oh, the carousel kit also has black dye, but I decided to save it for later, because I didn't have enough cloth for the dye as is.

carousel spiral…oh, the carousel kit also has black dye, but I decided to save it for later, because I didn’t have enough cloth for the dye as is.


primary color spiral

primary color spiral


spiral and a crumpled shirt on the right. Both had some nylon components. You can see how those parts didn't take to the dye, just very faintly.

spiral and a crumpled shirt on the right. Both had some nylon components. You can see how those parts didn’t take to the dye, just very faintly.


a closer look at the nylon with only faint dye

a closer look at the nylon with only faint dye


Why synthetics don't work with reactive dye: Left side - polyester socks; all of the pink, teal, and purple washed out during the rinse. Some light blue remnants stayed even after the washing machine. On right - nylon capri tights with a small amount of spandex. These are actually kind of cool. The dye is just much lighter, and even was when I originally applied the dye.

Why synthetics don’t work with reactive dye: Left side – polyester socks; all of the pink, teal, and purple washed out during the rinse. Some light blue remnants stayed even after the washing machine.
On right – nylon capri tights with a small amount of spandex. These are actually kind of cool. The dye is just much lighter, and even was when I originally applied the dye.


So that’s it! Now you can tie-dye! 🙂





DIY: Tissue Paper Flower Tutorial

5 04 2013

The post popular (and easiest) art project we do with the Humanities in Medicine volunteering program is making tissue paper flowers. This is a great project; it’s low-cost, fast, easy, and anyone can learn to do it. I’ve taught this one to several kids and older patients at the hospital, and most people need some solid instruction for their first go. After that, it’s super simple.

Since I’m always benefiting from other peoples’ online tutorials, I thought I’d make one here with lots of photos since I finally have the time (nothing like taking the day off work to get sun only to have it rainy and cloudy).

Tissue Paper Flowers

Supplies: a pair of scissors, 1 pipe cleaner, and assorted tissue paper (kleenex also works)

Supplies: a pair of scissors, 1 pipe cleaner, and assorted tissue paper (kleenex also works)


First, cut the pipe cleaner in half (unless you want a really long stem, or to wrap the stem around something).

First, cut the pipe cleaner in half (unless you want a really long stem, or to wrap the stem around something).


Now cut the paper. This pack of tissue paper unfolds into rough rectangles that are the right shape, so I just cut on those. You want it to be rectangular. Cut 4 - 5 sheets, approx. the same size. It's okay if some are shorter/wider than the others.

Now cut the paper. This pack of tissue paper unfolds into rough rectangles that are the right shape, so I just cut on those. You want it to be rectangular. Cut 4 – 5 sheets, approx. the same size. It’s okay if some are shorter/wider than the others.


Here are my 5 sheets. (Normally I do 4, but I cut the light pink not realizing it was so close to the white.)

Here are my 5 sheets. (Normally I do 4, but I cut the light pink not realizing it was so close to the white.)


Stack all the pieces together. If they differ in size, try to center them as best as possible. Then, starting at one of the short sides, grasp all the papers in the stack and give a small fold upwards.

Stack all the pieces together. If they differ in size, try to center them as best as possible. Then, starting at one of the short sides, grasp all the papers in the stack and give a small fold upwards.


Flip the stack over. (Now my fold is at the top because of how I flipped it.) Make a fold on that side, the reverse of the first side you folded. The fold should be the same size. Basically, we're going to accordion fold the whole thing.

Flip the stack over. (Now my fold is at the top because of how I flipped it.) Make a fold on that side, the reverse of the first side you folded. The fold should be the same size. Basically, we’re going to accordion fold the whole thing.


You can see the accordion fold here. We're part way through. Do this to the whole thing.

You can see the accordion fold here. We’re part way through. Do this to the whole thing.


Completed accordion fold. Then squish it flat.

Completed accordion fold. Then squish it flat.


Squishing it flat makes a rectangle shape like the one here. Take your 1/2 pipe cleaner and wrap a small part of it around the middle of the rectangle. Twist the end around so that the point of the pipe cleaner doesn't stick out.

Squishing it flat makes a rectangle shape like the one here. Take your 1/2 pipe cleaner and wrap a small part of it around the middle of the rectangle. Twist the end around so that the point of the pipe cleaner doesn’t stick out.


Now the pipe cleaner is wrapped, firmly but with the rectangle still flat. Now we have to fan out the 2 sides of the rectangle. Note: if you want to jazz up the petals, you can shape the ends of the rectangle by cutting with scissors before you fan it out.

Now the pipe cleaner is wrapped, firmly but with the rectangle still flat. Now we have to fan out the 2 sides of the rectangle. Note: if you want to jazz up the petals, you can shape the ends of the rectangle by cutting with scissors before you fan it out.


I've "fanned out" 1/2 of the rectangle. Next I'll do this to the other side. The sides will not meet; that is normal.

I’ve “fanned out” 1/2 of the rectangle. Next I’ll do this to the other side. The sides will not meet; that is normal.


With my "fan out" complete, I now take the top-facing layer of tissue paper (the blue) and, starting with 1 side, gently pull it up away from the others.

With my “fan out” complete, I now take the top-facing layer of tissue paper (the blue) and, starting with 1 side, gently pull it up away from the others.


You can see better from this angle how to pull up the paper. If it tears a little, that's okay.

You can see better from this angle how to pull up the paper. If it tears a little, that’s okay.


Now one side of the blue is completely pulled up. It's time to do the same thing with the blue on the other side.

Now one side of the blue is completely pulled up. It’s time to do the same thing with the blue on the other side.


Ta da! One layer is done. Now do the same with the layer below, etc. until all layers are pulled up.

Ta da! One layer is done. Now do the same with the layer below, etc. until all layers are pulled up.


2 of the layers are pulled up.

2 of the layers are pulled up.


Your flower is complete!

Your flower is complete!


You can make alterations if you like. Sometimes if you pull up the top layer or two now, pushing the others flat a bit, you can trim those shorter. It can make a daffodil effect. You can't see it well here; I'd recommend different colors.

You can make alterations if you like. Sometimes if you pull up the top layer or two now, pushing the others flat a bit, you can trim those shorter. It can make a daffodil effect. You can’t see it well here; I’d recommend different colors.


Here I trimmed the blue shorter and pulled it away from the center, gluing a button to the center.

Here I trimmed the blue shorter and pulled it away from the center, gluing a button to the center.


Easy peasy! You can also make a tissue paper butterfly to sit on the flower but that one’ll have to come later. 🙂








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