Mini Peacock

30 05 2013

Gonna be part 2 of a 4 part bird series…
peacock mini

Now time for dinner. Tofu parmesan risotto – good or bad idea? About to find out!





A Year Closer to 30

17 05 2013

There’s nothing wrong with being 30, but it’s a little bit of a wake up call to realize that I’ve only got 2 more birthdays until then. I had such a great time at Disney for my birthday (where else?) that I *have* to post about it! Since it’s not art related, in obligatory art news: I sold my first jewelry commission and first international order this week. International shipping is a lot more involved than I thought. Who knew?

As for Orlando…

Lake Eola's iconic fountain

Lake Eola’s iconic fountain

I brought my 50 mm lens with me…first time I’ve ever brought a decent camera to Magic Kingdom. You can’t zoom (in or out, at all) with this set focal length lens, but it works well for low lighting.

look familiar?

look familiar?


This is the rose from Beauty and the Beast! The Beast’s Castle is a new feature in Fantasyland – basically a lunch/dinner restaurant with 3 rooms to choose from. The rose is in the dark West Wing, complete with thunder sounds and lightning.

We ate in the ballroom which was my favorite:

Talk about chandeliers!

Talk about chandeliers!

It was even “snowing” outside the windows, which were made to look like night time.

Small World

Small World


Above is my favorite room from It’s a Small World. Another scene I like:
27bday33

They still do the electrical parade with the same music… my mom got me a cassette tape of the music when I was a toddler, and we’d listen to it on every car trip.

Tinker Bell

Tinker Bell


Alice and Wonderland

Alice and Wonderland


dwarves' gem cart

dwarves’ gem cart


27bday46

By the end of the night, we made our way to the front to watch fireworks:

pretty castle detail at night

pretty castle detail at night


27bday51
27bday52
No Photoshop - the castle was really that blue and the sky that red

No Photoshop – the castle was really that blue and the sky that red


27bday54
Fireworks are the perfect birthday prezzie.





Should have been a metaphor…

8 05 2013

2008

2008


Did an awesome bird painting this past weekend but (in light of car troubles) haven’t had time to photograph, so..here’s this oldie. What is it supposed to mean? I dunno. This was a really fast thing in Sharpie and acrylic when I was angry with life in 2008.

I hate photographing paintings. I’m terrible at it. When I go to crop them in Photoshop, it’s always really out of balance and never in the sizing ratio it’s supposed to be in. Then sometimes it goes like this painting: where the top photo is blurry and the bottom is clear yet cropped too far in.

Bah.

Bah.


Bah, linear problems.





DIY Tie-Dye: Photo Tutorial

4 05 2013

tie dye1
Yeah! I decided a few weeks ago to try tie-dye and have become slightly obsessed! A couple nights ago I did a massive tie dye session (partly to try out a new range of dye colors, and partly for something that I have future Etsy plans for), and managed to document with photos. Though others have done tie-dye tutorials before and better than me, I decided to share my experience:

everything you need

everything you need


See your “ingredients” above. Every source I read recommended to use soda ash, which is this white powder you pour into water that helps the cloth absorb dye. I bought this Tulip brand soda ash for $6 at Hobby Lobby. It comes with 2 packs. I also bought Tulip dye. The small primary color package costs $10; the Carousel package is $20 and has extra dye packets (but Hobby Lobby has a weekly 40% off coupon).
It’s also SUPER important to remember: use NATURAL fabrics. This tutorial is for fiber reactive dye like Tulip which is, from what I’ve seen, the easiest stuff to find, use, and buy. So – make sure your fabrics are cotton, silk, viscose, rayon….if it’s synthetic like polyester, it won’t bind with the dye (acid dyes are another story). See the end of the post to see what happens when you try to dye synthetics the “wrong way.” Oh, also if you’re using cotton – remember that it shrinks, so you might want to wash it first.
You need gloves, because this stuff will dye your skin. Seriously. I turned the garage into my work station by laying down plastic garbage bags.
First step: fill a bucket with water and pour in the soda ash:
Adding soda ash to water

Adding soda ash to water


What you want to do is stir in and soak all your fabrics for about 20 minutes:
Add and stir all cloth into the soda ash water.

Add and stir all cloth into the soda ash water.


Then wring out each piece and lay flat on the garbage bags. You DO want them to be wet when you dye them.

Then wring out each piece and lay flat on the garbage bags. You DO want them to be wet when you dye them.


lay out flat...

lay out flat…


Then you have to bind up with rubber bands all your fabrics. You can do a spiral, bulls eye, stripes, crumply style, etc….endless options. I won’t get into too much detail about how to do those, because if you get a Tulip dye kit, it has a “how to” guide.
Quick spiral example: from your laid-flat shirt, pick a point that you want to be the center of the spiral.

Quick spiral example: from your laid-flat shirt, pick a point that you want to be the center of the spiral.


Hold the point and twist. Keep twisting until the shirt is fully wrapped; it will look kind of like a hurricane.

Hold the point and twist. Keep twisting until the shirt is fully wrapped; it will look kind of like a hurricane.


You can see the "hurricane" shape start to form. Try to tuck in the edges and end with a circular lump. Bind it with rubber bands.

You can see the “hurricane” shape start to form. Try to tuck in the edges and end with a circular lump. Bind it with rubber bands.


Here's a bunch of my shirts bound up.

Here’s a bunch of my shirts bound up.


Now it’s time to dye! Be very careful, because if it gets anywhere, it will stain.
Fill up the dye bottles to the line at the top. They already have dye in them. Then shake until all the powdered dye is dissolved.

Fill up the dye bottles to the line at the top. They already have dye in them. Then shake until all the powdered dye is dissolved.


A spiral example: the bound-up spiral looks kind of like a pie. Think of pie pieces when you dye it. Squeeze a triangle of 1 color and do the same on the triangle opposite.

A spiral example: the bound-up spiral looks kind of like a pie. Think of pie pieces when you dye it. Squeeze a triangle of 1 color and do the same on the triangle opposite.


Add your next color. I love overlapping to make purples, greens, and oranges.

Add your next color. I love overlapping to make purples, greens, and oranges.


Last, add the yellow.

Last, add the yellow.


Flip it over. Now dye this side. You want to put as much dye as possible - there will still be white places inside the folds of the shirt.

Flip it over. Now dye this side. You want to put as much dye as possible – there will still be white places inside the folds of the shirt.


Primary colored spiral on the left, carousel colored one of the right

Primary colored spiral on the left, carousel colored one of the right


When finished, put each item into its own plastic bag. Wrap and leave for 24 hours. Tulip advises for 8, but you get nice bright colors with 24.

When finished, put each item into its own plastic bag. Wrap and leave for 24 hours. Tulip advises for 8, but you get nice bright colors with 24.


The next day, it's time to wash out the dye! Here's a piece fresh out of the bag that's dyed "bulls eye" style. Put on gloves...

The next day, it’s time to wash out the dye! Here’s a piece fresh out of the bag that’s dyed “bulls eye” style. Put on gloves…


Wash out the dye until the water runs clear. Some sources say use cold, some say warm, some say hot and fade to cold. I've tried it all 3 ways, and they all work. I prefer cold first, then warm (gets more magenta out), then finish with cold.

Wash out the dye until the water runs clear. Some sources say use cold, some say warm, some say hot and fade to cold. I’ve tried it all 3 ways, and they all work. I prefer cold first, then warm (gets more magenta out), then finish with cold.


Then take your rubber bands off (cut them if it's easier) and keep washing. This shirt is done; now I can hang it up until the rest are finished.

Then take your rubber bands off (cut them if it’s easier) and keep washing. This shirt is done; now I can hang it up until the rest are finished.


After rinsing out, you’ll then need to put the items in the washing machine. I use warm water and detergent. The colors will fade but only slightly. Here’s the finished bulls eye shirt:
finished bulls eye

finished bulls eye


Back to the washing:
This one is a double spiral with crumpled ends.

This one is a double spiral with crumpled ends.


...with the rubber bands off, still wet

…with the rubber bands off, still wet


Here are some more of the final products:
carousel spiral...oh, the carousel kit also has black dye, but I decided to save it for later, because I didn't have enough cloth for the dye as is.

carousel spiral…oh, the carousel kit also has black dye, but I decided to save it for later, because I didn’t have enough cloth for the dye as is.


primary color spiral

primary color spiral


spiral and a crumpled shirt on the right. Both had some nylon components. You can see how those parts didn't take to the dye, just very faintly.

spiral and a crumpled shirt on the right. Both had some nylon components. You can see how those parts didn’t take to the dye, just very faintly.


a closer look at the nylon with only faint dye

a closer look at the nylon with only faint dye


Why synthetics don't work with reactive dye: Left side - polyester socks; all of the pink, teal, and purple washed out during the rinse. Some light blue remnants stayed even after the washing machine. On right - nylon capri tights with a small amount of spandex. These are actually kind of cool. The dye is just much lighter, and even was when I originally applied the dye.

Why synthetics don’t work with reactive dye: Left side – polyester socks; all of the pink, teal, and purple washed out during the rinse. Some light blue remnants stayed even after the washing machine.
On right – nylon capri tights with a small amount of spandex. These are actually kind of cool. The dye is just much lighter, and even was when I originally applied the dye.


So that’s it! Now you can tie-dye! 🙂








%d bloggers like this: